Rotary raises funds to fight polio

 
Polio battle: District Rotary Foundation chair Paul Reid receives cheques for more than $8200 from Assistant Governor Northern Illawarra Rotary Clubs Sue Clark and former president of UOW Rotoract Club Zac Fitzpatrick.
Polio battle: District Rotary Foundation chair Paul Reid receives cheques for more than $8200 from Assistant Governor Northern Illawarra Rotary Clubs Sue Clark and former president of UOW Rotoract Club Zac Fitzpatrick.
 
Rotary’s recent Box Office Screening featured Hidden Figures, the incredible untold story of Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe) – brilliant African-American women working at NASA, who were the brains behind one of the greatest operations in history: the launch of astronaut John Glenn into orbit, a stunning achievement that restored the nation’s confidence, turned around the Space Race, and galvanized the world. This visionary trio crossed all gender and race lines to inspire generations to dream big.
 
On arrival at the Gala Cinema, Warrawong, on February 1, guests enjoyed finger food, champagne, orange juice and soft drinks before the movie began.
 
The outstanding support of local Rotarians, their families and friends raised $3215.50 for polio eradication.
 
The UOW Rotaract Club holds an annual event, Humans v Zombies, a giant game of tag using Nerf Guns. Some of the Rotaractors dress up and are gruesomely made up as zombies. This project was highlighted in last week’s story.  This year’s event will be held on April 22. Proceeds from the 2015 and 2016 games made $5000 in total for Rotary’s End Polio Now campaign.
 
Recently, as a result of these two initiatives, Assistant Governor Sue Clark and District Rotaract Chair Zac Fitzpatrick each presented a cheque from the proceeds of both projects to District Rotary Foundation Chair, Paul Reid.
 
The Bill and Melinda Gates’ Foundation contributes $2 for every $1 that Rotarians raise; these cheques now translate to a total of $8215, becoming $16,430, providing 11,253 polio vials.
 
Rotary is respected in all parts of the world for its tenacity to continue this fight to the end.
 
Many Australians know somebody whose life has been affected by polio – now 55+ years old – but it can still be brought here on a plane.  It is still in Afghanistan and Pakistan and returned to Nigeria in 2016 which has meant mass vaccinations occurring immediately to prevent it spreading further.
 
To date in 2017, there have been two new cases in Afghanistan, one in Pakistan, none in Nigeria.
 
For information on how to connect with our Rotary Clubs contact Dot Hennessy on 0412 120 314 or email dothennessy@gmail.com.